July 8, 2016

The Weekly Wins: The end of Online and Offline

WRITTEN BY: Michelle Knight

Let’s call it how it is, today there is no such this as being online or offline.

While AR, VR and Mixed Reality expand their engagement territory, the concept of an on and off switch is far-fetched. Even UX is about breaking through hardware. And this week is proof: we take a look at Apple’s most recent patent, the UX secret, Typeface transcends offline, Splash 360-degree videos and Stylish AR.

Soak up that Friday feeling and down a shot with a sweet side of the top digital marketing news.

1.  #NoPhotos at gigs thanks to Apple

Apple will soon have the power to shut off our photo taking abilities at concerts, unless of course you still rock an old school camera. They have recently been awarded a patent to stop recording at concerts, according to Pitchfork, ‘the technology allows a camera to detect not just visible light, but also infrared data.’ This feels more appropriate for the cinema experience than the FOMO inducing snippets of our favorite gig.

The recording industry could easily use this technology to disable a camera during a music concert by blasting an infrared signal from the stage.

2. You should know loading time is deliberate.

Apparently, a longer load time means we feel safer. Menu has shared the not-so-secret UX feature that will ruin apps for you. The truth is that Facebook servers crunch our data in milliseconds, but they design it to take longer. Why you ask? Well that’s simple, it’s to make us feel safe. They term is “artificial waiting” and many apps and websites use this interface. This is well worth a read as it look at how expectation shapes our experience of the world.

3. Typeface transcends offline

This should excite the designers out there. Highnobiety shared a design tool that lets you save typefaces and colours from the real world. And, it is the brainchild of Fiona O’Leary a design student. Specter takes the fonts and/or colors that it captures and then transfers it to Adobe InDesign. It can even store up to 20 font samples, giving you time to collect before you upload.

All you have to do is place the handheld device over a piece of media and then press the button on top.

4. Take 360-degree videos with Splash

We met Splash at SXSW this year and now it seems to be living up to its name. It’s a virtual reality app that aims to make 360-degree videos as easy as Snapchat, according to Mashable. It’s an “emotional landscape” according to cofounder Michael Ronen. This app allows you to quickly share 360-degree videos of your surroundings that can be viewed on both smartphones and VR headsets like Google Cardboard.

Technically, no one knows what VR is. We know one thing: at the moment, the only way to start it is by making something we already know…to make videos. Why did Facebook and YouTube make 360 players? Because they know that this is the first step.

5. Laforge are making AR stylish

Augment reality is receiving a large amount of interest and developments on the wearable front. Eyewear company Laforge plan to release their alpha version by the end of 2016. According to VRScout, they have been working on this prototype since 2013. The glasses should be able to snap photos, post online, and play music. These fashion-focused glasses are called Shima and should be available this year.